Equipoise, or The Art of Acceptance

In a time when incivility, rudeness, extremism, intolerance, and self-righteousness dominate in the media and on the street, David Brooks pleas for equipoise (“In Praise of Equipoise,” The New York Times, September 1, 2017). Huh? Equipoise? What’s that? Equal poise across situations. The concept appears to have originated in the East. Something like Buddhist non-attachment. … Continue reading Equipoise, or The Art of Acceptance

Advertisements

Tyranny Prevention

Yale University’s Levin Professor of History Timothy Snyder has written a manifesto for democracy titled On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century (New York: Tim Duggan Books, 2017). This little volume (128 pages, 6” x 4.5”) packs a wallop. Although he never names anyone as his focal tyrant wannabe, the reader knows that this … Continue reading Tyranny Prevention

Understanding Your Panic Button

I have more terms of endearment for my wife than there are waves headed for the beach. And like waves, they just keep on coming. Turn-of-the-century anthropologist Franz Boas (1858-1942) first identified this phenomenon. People have more words for things that are most important to them. Snow is vitally important to those living within the … Continue reading Understanding Your Panic Button

What Does Meaning Mean?

Give me a break! That was my first thought when I read these passages in a scholarly article: “How do students make meaning when they explore their strengths?” “Does their meaning-making influence their daily lives?” “Identify your strengths and give them meaning.” “Enabling a deep analysis of personal meaning-making…” “Depending on individual meaning-making, etc….” “…reflection … Continue reading What Does Meaning Mean?

Beauty, Billions, and Brains

My search for summer reading led me to a first novel by Stuart Rojstaczer (ROYCE-teacher)--The Mathematician’s Shiva (Penguin, 2014). Hadn’t heard of it, but it sounded intriguing—a fictional, brilliant, female, University of Wisconsin mathematician named Rachela Karnokovitch was dead, and brainy mathematicians from around the were globe sitting shiva. Much of the story dealt with … Continue reading Beauty, Billions, and Brains

Appearances Can Be Deceiving (6. Perfectionism)

Good enough for government work—not! The government has its share of perfectionists, as well as its share of those with casual standards. Perfectionism is normally distributed throughout the world. It is neither a good nor a bad thing—rather, its value depends on the needs of a particular situation. My wife once worked with a government … Continue reading Appearances Can Be Deceiving (6. Perfectionism)

Appearances Can Be Deceiving (5. Volunteering)

“Never volunteer for anything!” That is what they cautioned me when I left the comforts of home in eastern North Carolina for basic training at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, in the sweltering Fall of 1963. In four previous posts, I presented behaviors that are often interpreted in one way but that could have other possible … Continue reading Appearances Can Be Deceiving (5. Volunteering)